Category: Finding Sinkholes

October 4, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

Prudent homeowners should compare surface depressions with any damage to their home and cross reference the locations with the severity of the damage. Damage to the house is the simplest indicator of a progressive problem that needs to be investigated.






July 7, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

Additionally, water percolating through soil completely alters the characteristics of the soil. Although some soil material is compacted, the addition of water acts to “reorient” or change the density of the material. This usually happens only in the shallow soil, as the deeper material is still under the pressure of the soil above it. In a lot of ways, soil is acting not as a solid material but as a dynamic material reacting to the climate changes. When those changes are dramatic during heavy summer rains, more changes are often observed in the homes.






June 25, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

The Statute simply requires the insurance expert to perform what ever testing is sufficient in their professional opinion. This is again a very subjective definition which is a point of contention in many of these cases. You have to remember that it is the insurance company’s burden to rule out sinkhole activity at the property so, what does constitute sufficient testing necessary to rule sinkhole activity?






June 21, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

The problem with this argument from a homeowner’s perspective is that once they deny the claim due to the damage theory, what can the homeowner do? Now a homeowner is forced to either hire their own engineering firm (at a cost of thousands of dollars) or hire an attorney. What the insurance companies often don’t tell their insureds is that if the insured requests it, the insurance must come out and complete the testing.






June 16, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

The State of Florida also does not enforce any concrete rules requiring builders to test for sinkhole activity prior to new construction. The best indicators to look for as a purchaser are visible cracks to the home. Take a good look and if none are visible, the concern should be low. You may also want to check the property appraiser’s website to see if any neighboring homes have had confirmed sinkhole claims although this may be a tedious project.






June 7, 2010 by Morgan Barfield

Because the energy behind sinkholes is water, the rise and fall of the water table often causes additional activity. As the water washes over limestone, it increases the dissolution of the rock and continues to move soil away from the location. By so doing, the limestone is more like to sink or move. During seasonal changes, the action of water then causes more of settlement.